Monthly Archives: July 2009

hahahaha  “david…foster…wallace…XOXO”

Bonnie

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Current reads

We have a book at the Co-op for visitors to record their most recent reads, but I sometimes have a hard time dredging up memories of the last thing I’ve fully finished from beginning to end. Working in a bookstore (and with a well-stocked library and used book emporium just down the street), I take home such a glut of interesting-looking books that I have the happy option to pick and choose, start reading one thing, put it down if it’s just not the right read for the moment, and take up something new. The only sad consequence of this constant literary smorgasboard is winding up with a lot of half-finished books untidily piled around my apartment, rather than a nice, well-organized stack of properly completed and reviewed works.

Right now I’m reading The Well of Loneliness by Radclyffe Hall, and with about a third of it down, I might actually finish two books in a row this month!

Dora

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i  just read “Broom of the System” by David Foster Wallace. it was incredible. it’s been awhile since i’ve read some thing that i’ve connected so deeply with and laughed so hard at.  i want to read everything by him.

Bonnie

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Astonishing Graphic Novel

 Imogene’s Antlers by David Small has always been one of my favorite childrens books so I was eager to read his graphic memoir Stitches, but not prepared for the intensity of it. With drawings and spare words, he relives his troubled childhood with his frighteningly unhappy mother and physician father. After X-Ray treatments from his father, he develops cancer at the age of 14 but no one tells him. He awakes from surgery scarred, mute, and confused about what happened and why. At 16 he leaves hom…more Imogene’s Antlers by David Small has always been one of my favorite childrens books so I was eager to read his graphic memoir Stitches, but not prepared for the intensity of it. With drawings and spare words, he relives his troubled childhood with his frighteningly unhappy mother and physician father. After X-Ray treatments from his father, he develops cancer at the age of 14 but no one tells him. He awakes from surgery scarred, mute, and confused about what happened and why. At 16 he leaves home and lives on his own. As we know, he eventually overcomes his past and becomes a leading author and illustrator but none of us could have guessed the trauma he endured and the path he took to become an artist. This is an amazing book. Posted by Suzy.

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